AusMilitary.com Formerly AusSpecialForces.com             
AusSpecialForces.com
 Ausmilitary.com: Of this, we are certain.   Home •  Contact •  Advertising •   Bookmark and Share  •  Become a Supporter !
It is currently Mon Jan 17, 2022 7:55 am


*** SECURITY NOTICE: You are using the non-encrypted version of the site. Click here to swtich to the SSL-encrypted version. ***



Some gave all. We will remember them.






 
  

All times are UTC + 10 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:30 pm 
Offline
 

Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:23 pm
Posts: 1
Hi everyone,

I am just wondering the true meaning of Rememberance Day?

I know it was meant to signify the end of WWI but can someone give me the background of this day?

Thanks!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:51 pm 
Offline
 

Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 2:11 pm
Posts: 1273
A big hint as to what 'Remembrance' day is, is in the name, and the date it is observed..


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 5:18 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2004 8:10 pm
Posts: 17995
Location: Loading the shot
Served in: 8/9RAR & 6RAR
That about covers it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 6:10 am 
Offline
Supporter
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 2:41 pm
Posts: 2327
Served in: Timor 03 and 06, Southern Ocean/Antarctica, Afghanistan, et al,
I just wonder about these kids doing their school assignments who think it's easier to create an account on a forum and ask randoms a question rather than starting at the wiki page.

Next week, the true meaning of Christmas


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 8:13 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2006 1:22 pm
Posts: 2025
Served in: ARES and ARA
What's a battle?

I mean I know what a battle is, but what is it really? :smt017


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 2:48 pm 
Offline
Supporter
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 12:07 pm
Posts: 896
*groan* Thinks to self...self don't 'bite', whatever you do, don't 'bite'.

I really do despair sometimes.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2015 2:55 pm 
Offline
Supporter
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 12:07 pm
Posts: 896
Nah...fcuk it! I'm 'biting', if only to edumacate the yoof of today.

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month was originally known as Armistice Day; however, after World War II, the day became Remembrance Day to commemorate all those who have died in war.

On the first anniversary of the armistice in 1919, two minutes' silence was instituted as part of the main commemorative ceremony at the new Cenotaph in London.

The silence was proposed by Australian journalist Edward Honey who was working in Fleet Street.

There, happy now...if anything a quick 'soldiers five'.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:40 pm 
Offline
Supporter
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 12:07 pm
Posts: 896
And, while I'm at it, may as well do the follow up as to the origins of the Last Post.

Arthur Lane was a bugler in the British Army when he was captured by Japanese forces during the fall of Singapore in 1942. He spent the remainder of World War Two in PoW camps and working on the notorious Burma Railway. But he also had a more melancholy duty. He still had his bugle with him and it was his task to sound the Last Post for each of his comrades who died during those years. For the rest of his long life, he was haunted by nightmares. And he never played the Last Post again.

The sound of a lone bugler playing the Last Post has become one of the most distinctive sounds in the world. Eerie and evocative, it exists beyond all the usual barriers of nation, religion, race and class, charged with the memory of generations of the fallen. But it wasn't always like this. The Last Post was first published in the 1790s, just one of the two dozen or so bugle calls sounded daily in British Army camps. At that time soldiers didn't have wristwatches, so they had to be regulated in camp, they had to have a trumpet call or a bugle call to tell them when to get up, when to have their meals, when to fetch the post, when to get on parade, when to go to bed and all other things throughout the day.

The soldier's day started with the call of Reveille, and came to a close with the First Post. This indicated that the duty officer was commencing his inspection of the sentry-posts on the perimeter of the camp. The inspection would take about 30 minutes, and at the end there would be sounded the Last Post, the name referring simply to the fact that the final sentry-post had been inspected. For decades this was the sole use of the call, a signal that the camp was now secure for the night, closed till morning.

It was not until the 1850s that another role began to emerge. It was an era when many military bandsmen, and most bandmasters, were civilians and were under no obligation to accompany their regiments on overseas postings. So when a soldier died in a foreign land, there was often no music available to accompany him on his final journey. And, necessity being the mother of invention, a new custom arose of charging the regimental bugler to sound the Last Post over the grave. The symbolism was simple and highly effective.

The Last Post now signalled the end not merely of the day but of this earthly life. And, as the practice developed it was then followed by few moments of silent prayer and by the sounding of Reveille, the first call of the day, to signify the man's rebirth into eternal life. A further dimension was added in the first years of the 20th Century. The end of the Boer War saw the rise of war memorials. This was a break with the past. The traditional way of commemorating a victory was to erect a statue to the general or the commander. But these monuments listed the names of the dead, both officers and other ranks, the men the Duke of Wellington was said to have called "the scum of the earth".

There was a new mood of democracy abroad and the war memorials reflected this. And every time a memorial was unveiled, it was to the sound of the Last Post being played, now the symbol not only of death but of remembrance.

By the time that WW1 broke out in 1914, the Last Post was already part of the national culture. During the war, it was played countless times at funerals iat the Western Front and it was played at funerals, memorials and services back home. It was already becoming a familiar sound, but with mass enlistment, the walls that had long existed between the civilian and the soldier broke down completely, and a piece of music that had once belonged exclusively to military culture was adopted by a wider society. HG Wells said this was "a people's war", and the Last Post became the people's anthem. So it remains. In the decades that followed WW1, it became almost a sacred anthem in an increasingly secular society.

Arthur Lane, sounding the Last Post in Japanese prisoner-of-war camps, became known as "the musician to the dead". He kept with him, for the duration of his captivity, a roll of army-issue toilet-paper, on which he dutifully recorded the names and details of each of the men whose funeral he attended. And at the end of the war, he counted up the names. He had sounded the Last Post for over 3,000 of his fallen comrades.

So endeth the lesson.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Meaning of Rememberance Day?
PostPosted: Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:47 pm 
Offline
 

Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2015 7:53 pm
Posts: 1105
Served in: RAR
With that spelling perhaps he was working for that #yourtaxis mob.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

 

All times are UTC + 10 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Brotherhood never was like it;
Friendship is not the word;
But deep in that body of marching men
The soul of a nation stirred.

-- A.B. "Banjo" Patterson,
    'Australia Today', 1916


AusMilitary.com is Australia's leading military discussion forum. Originally formed back in 2004 as AusSpecialForces.com as a forum for, by, and about the Australian Special Forces, the forum has since widened it's scope to include all members and branches of the ADF as well as our honoured guests and allies from overseas. Despite some sections being open to the public, the forum still enjoys the membership and advice of respected members of the Special Forces and Special Operations Forces both local and international, as well as those from elite specialities in the conventional forces. From recruit training right up to SF selection tips - if it's frank and honest advice you're after, you'll find it here.